Preview 2020

Ricciardi 2020!

When novels turn into comic books!

By Luca Crovi 

We are active, when in front of a written text. We can’t do anything else, while we are reading a book, we can’t chat, be on the social networks, watch a movie...

While trying to highlight the relationship between his imagination and the comic adaptation of his Commissario Ricciardi stories, the writer, Maurizio de Giovanni, explained to his readers how you could move from one medium to another. You can keep the patterns of a successful literary series, and at the same time, change them: “We are active, when in front of a written text. We can’t do anything else, while we are reading a book, we can’t chat, be on the social networks, watch a movie. That’s one of the reasons why novels, movies, TV series, and comics have very different languages. As a novelist, what I can reproduce in my books is mainly the interior life of my characters. I tell their feelings more than their actions. When you are working with a visual language, you need to entrust the interiority of the characters to their expressions, faces, and interactions. Therefore, ‘Il Commissario Ricciardi a fumetti’ is not a translation of my literary invention. It’s the translation of what I imagined into another imagination”.


Art by Lucilla Stellato.


Therefore, ‘Il Commissario Ricciardi a fumetti’ is not a translation of my literary invention. It’s the translation of what I imagined into another imagination”. That translation into another vision of Maurizio de Giovanni’s stories allowed us to adapt novels such as “Il senso del dolore”, “La condanna del sangue”, “Il posto di ognuno”, “Il giorno dei morti”, by assigning them to the interpretational talent of artists like Daniele Bigliardo, Lucilla Stellato, Alessandro Nespolino and the narrative ability of writers such as Claudio Falco, Paolo Terracciano, and Sergio Brancato. A formidable team that took our readers inside the 1930s Naples as told by de Giovanni, creating the cycle of four long stories that form “Le stagioni del Commissario Ricciardi”. They also were able to recreate a few short stories in the volumes “Dieci centesimi e altre storie” and “Quando si dice il destino altre storie”.

In May there will be a new Ricciardi Magazine, with three original stories featuring the Commissario of Naples’ Royal Police, and one tale about the Bastards of Pizzofalcone.

Due to the excellent teamwork of writers and artists, and the appreciation of our readers, in 2020 we are working on the adaptations of three more novels by De Giovanni, that form the so-called Festivities Trilogy (“Per mano mia”, “Vipera”, and “In fondo al tuo cuore”), with art by Daniele Bigliardo, Lucilla Stellato, Alessandro Nespolino. Luigi Siniscalchi is working on the so-called Cycle of the Songs, starting from “Anime di vetro”.

As for the rest of our preview, in May there will be a new Ricciardi Magazine, with three original stories featuring the Commissario of Naples’ Royal Police, and one tale about the Bastards of Pizzofalcone with the debut of a new artist, Carmelo Zagaria. In summer we’ll see the adaptation of “Buio”, by Fabiana Fiengo. The connection between Bonelli comics and literature will go on also with the volume edition of “Black Hat Jack”, a novella by Joe R. Lansdale reinterpreted by Mauro Boselli and Stefano Andreucci, that now will come to the bookstores. An adventure of the African-American cowboy Deadwood Dick, created by the Texan author Joe R. Lansdale. Dick tells us one of his most incredible adventures: the Second Battle of Adobe Walls, which took place on June 27, 1874. In this epic feat, Deadwood Dick, his friend Black Hat Jack, and a handful of buffalo hunters came under attack of hundreds of Comanche, Cheyenne, Kiowa, and Arapaho warriors. A day when it was tough to keep your scalp attached to your head!


The "Bastardi" art by Fabiana Fiengo.

Our collaboration with Lansdale will go on with the comic version of another of his stories, starring the Reverend Jebidiah Mercer, titled “The Gentlemen’s Hotel”.

Our collaboration with Lansdale will go on with the comic version of another of his stories, starring the Reverend Jebidiah Mercer, titled “The Gentlemen’s Hotel”. Lansdale describes Jebidiah as “a tall, lanky individual with hard cheekbones, a pointy chin, black hair, and eyes. Handsome, in some strange way... a hero that fights supernatural creatures: vampires, werewolves, conquistador-zombies, Indians who came back to life. Something in him resembles Solomon Kane and Jonah Hex”, and his stories are collected in the volume “Deadman’s Road’”.

The writer himself chose the artist that will revisit his hero. It’s Daniele Serra, who has also been the cover artist for several novels by Stephen King, Clive Barker, and Lansdale: “Daniele already illustrated some of my novels, and adapted two of my novellas. His style is sometimes impressionistic, and other times more realistic. You can’t put him in a box. I love his art”.


Art by Daniele Serra.


Another match that surely will impress our readers is between the artist, Pasquale Frisenda, and the writer, Michele Medda, who are working on a Bonelli version of “The Tartar Steppe” by Dino Buzzati. Meanwhile, Giuseppe Baiguera and Maurizio Colombo are trying their hand on the adaption of Omar Di Monopoli’s novel “In God’s Malicious Land” (“Nella perfida terra di Dio”) where rural-gothic and western mix in a dark story set in the Salento region of Italy.

Here you can find a few preview images of these projects that will sparkle your fantasy.


13/03/2020