1998

Julia

Julia

Thirty-ish, with short dark hair, like her eyes, far removed from the stereotype of the top model, Julia Kendall has a naturally elegant figure, with a slender and highly-strung body reminiscent of Audrey Hepburn, and features which, while not classifiable as belonging to the canons of classical beauty, make her definitely quite fascinating. Julia is fragile, reserved, averse to any form of violence. Yet she has embarked on a difficult and highly risky profession: that of the criminologist. And although she has resolved not to use firearms, in difficult situations she knows how to defend herself and she can summon up unsuspected energy. A criminologist like Julia is well versed in all fields of police investigations: she's an analyst, a psychologist, a detective, an anatomopathologist, specialized in careful detection of all the traces that can be scientifically uncovered at a crime scene. Her main preys are serial killers, but her field of investigation also ranges over the world of crime in general. Julia's method of investigation is based not only on the scientific knowledge she has acquired, but also on her own personal instinct, a special kind of sensitivity that enables her to get under the skin of the criminal she's tracking and gives her a heightened emotional awareness of the criminal's most likely next move, and of the motives that triggered the criminal action. Her intention, of course, is to ensure that miscreants are brought to justice, but also, and above all, to better understand - understand, not justify - the deep-seated pulsions that drive criminals to act they way they do. If there were such a category, one could define her as an "investigator of the soul". In any case, exploring his characters' most intimate feelings is an art in which Julia's creator, Giancarlo Berardi, is extremely proficient. After abandoning the nineteenth century and the wild Frontier lands that formed the background to the exploits of his most famous creature - Ken Parker - Berardi has shifted his field of action to a more recent period, namely our own time, which, however, is no less wild; furthermore, he favors a genre, the noir, which is particularly disturbing, tension-laden, full of unexpected developments.