1952

Poker

Poker

This attractive magazine, which was launched amid great expectations of success, actually turned out to be very short-lived (no more than two issues). The reasons for such a dramatic failure? Perhaps the Covers (and the pictures inside) were a little "ahead" of their time, with amusing 'pin-up girls ' designed by Albertarelli, Benvenuti and Donatelli. Or perhaps it was the fact that the albums contained a mixture of comic strips ("Rip Kirby", "Braccio di Ferro", the first cartoon pages of "Yuma Kid") and text stories as well as articles about cinema and the world of show business in general. Apparently this "mix" did not find favor among an appropriate group of readers, who may have been confused by the variety of elements contained in the magazine. Looking back on it from today's perspective, the concern it raised among habitual comic strip readers may give us cause to smile somewhat ironically, and perhaps (if one reflects on the multitude of analogous products on display at news-stands at the outset of the new Millennium) we may begin to feel nostalgic for a certain manner of writing and drawing, now regarded as thoroughly out-moded. One final curious observation. "Poker" was a more or less exceptional case in the history of our Publishing House in that its pages also hosted advertisements for commercial products.